What is hemp?

Hemp is a non-psychoactive variety of the Cannabis sativa plant

Signs of people using hemp for textiles and paper have shown up on archeological sites around the globe, making it one of the earliest cultivated plants. Today, hemp is grown for three main reasons: seed, fiber, and floral materials.

hemp seeds graphic illustration by harvey dustin owens and goodness creative studio for triangle hemp high-cbd nursery in raleigh durham nc

Seeds

Seeds are most often are used for food and oil production. This oil does not contain any CBD, but is a great source of omega 3 and 6 fatty acids.

Stalk

The stalk (also known as the fiber and hurd) can be used for building materials, textiles, and industrial applications. The hemp industry in the United States currently lacks the necessary infrastructure to process large amounts of hemp fiber, making it less viable as a business opportunity.

hemp stalk graphic illustration by harvey dustin owens and goodness creative studio for triangle hemp high-cbd nursery in raleigh durham nc
hemp stalk graphic illustration by harvey dustin owens and goodness creative studio for triangle hemp high-cbd nursery in raleigh durham nc

Stalk

The stalk (also known as the fiber and hurd) can be used for building materials, textiles, and industrial applications. The hemp industry in the United States currently lacks the necessary infrastructure to process large amounts of hemp fiber, making it less viable as a business opportunity.

hemp flower graphic illustration by harvey dustin owens and goodness creative studio for triangle hemp high-cbd nursery in raleigh durham nc

Flower

Floral materials are sold to hemp processors to be extracted for the cannabinoid rich oil the plant produces. There is also a burgeoning market for dried, smokable flower, which is being consumed as a tobacco alternative. It currently commands the highest dollar per pound value, but requires more attention and care.

Triangle Hemp provides field-ready starter plants for farmers to grow High-CBD hemp to be sold for its floral material.

Mature female cannabis CBD plant grown by Triangle Hemp in Raleigh-Durham NC

What is CBD?

CBD is short for cannabidiol

It is one of the many phytocannabinoids found in the hemp plant. CBD comes from the flowers of the plant and is commonly extracted in the form of oil. This oil can then be ingested in many ways—pills, tinctures, lotions, etc.

Why Should I Grow High-CBD Hemp?

High-CBD Hemp is poised to be a lucrative and versatile crop

Some people confuse hemp and marijuana because they are very similar plants. They share the same genus (Cannabis), they look the same, and they smell the same—but these plants have one key difference. Hemp contains below .3% Delta-9 THC.

CBD hemp field in NC with clones grown by Triangle Hemp nursery in Raleigh-Durham

CBD’s potential health benefits means a growing market for high-CBD hemp.

Delta-9 THC (tetrahydrocannabinol) is the primary compound in Cannabis that causes the “high” feeling. While hemp does not contain much THC, it does however, contain high levels of CBD (cannabidiol), which has shown efficacy in treating many ailments.

Our bodies have something called the endocannabinoid system. This regulates many of our physical processes and helps maintain overall wellness. It is responsible for sleep, mood, pain receptors, among other things.

Scientific and clinical research underscores CBD’s potential as a treatment for a wide range of conditions including, but not limited to:

For a deeper dive into CBD, visit Project CBD.

Mature female CBD cannabis hemp plants growing in Triangle Hemp’s greenhouse near Raleigh-Durham and Chapel Hill NC

How Do I Grow High-CBD Hemp?

Yielding a high-CBD harvest is possible with our field-ready female clones

Our clones eliminate the problems of inconsistent germination, male pollen, and spiked Delta-9 THC levels. Not one of our 70 farmers we worked with failed their Delta-9 THC tests. Buying Clones from us means you don't have to assume the risk and responsibility of planting unproven genetics and caring for plants in their most vulnerable stage, germination.

Clones are better than seeds

Hemp, when planted from seed, can have either male or female parts. Male plants do not contain CBD. Female plants fertilized by male pollen go into seed production. This lowers yield, as well as the total amount of CBD in the flower.

If you plant seeds, they will likely produce 50% male and 50% female plants. Male and female plants grown together produce hemp suited for fiber and seed—not high-CBD.

The only way to get 100% female plants is through asexual propagation, or “cloning”. And the only way to produce high-CBD hemp is with 100% female plants. In over 200 acres planted in 2018, not a single male was found amongst our plants.

Triangle Hemp provides field-ready female clones for farmers to grow High-CBD hemp to be sold for its floral material.

Hemp in North Carolina

Map of North Carolina for high-cbd hemp and cannabis education by Triangle Hemp

There are more than 400 farmers in the NC Hemp Pilot Program. It’s one of the fastest growing programs in the country.

The legality of hemp production varies widely between countries. Currently, more than 30 nations grow hemp as an agricultural commodity, which is sold on the world market. In the United States, production is only allowed when grown under a state-sanctioned pilot program by licensed farmers.

The Agricultural Act of 2014 started to change the direction of hemp production in the U.S. (more detailed information is available here) and in 2016, North Carolina’s legislature set up an industrial hemp pilot program.

Hemp production has been legalized in North Carolina as part of the state's pilot program.

Under the rules for the industrial hemp program, a farmer wishing to grow industrial hemp must apply to the Industrial Hemp Commission and receive a license. As part of the application, the applicant must list the GPS coordinates of where his or her industrial hemp will be grown and must show some income from farming on their tax returns.

A Brief History

Feb
2014
Section 7606 of the 2014 Farm Bill allowed states to set up pilot programs
Sep 2015
NC Senate Bill 313 and House Bill 992 enacted the pilot program to be overseen by the NC Department of Agriculture (NCDA)
Feb
2017
NCDA created Industrial Hemp Commission, responsible for developing rules and regulations
Jun 2017
Hemp plants went into the ground for the first time in North Carolina
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